Does Your Child Care Have the Moves?

As the summer months come to a close I wanted to share two resources, very different from each other, to encourage physical activity.  It's so much easier during the warm, long days to accidentally get moving because the kids get to be outside running around.  Burning off steam and staying healthy through that movement.  However, as it gets darker earlier and cooler - being outside is less of an automatic occurrence and more planned - as is physical activity. So as we ramp up for fall and winter - here are some resources that will be of use to you!

We Have The Moves - Healthy Habits For Life from Sesame Street

  • Have a small space? This is the resource for you.  
  • Have a big space? This is the resource for you.  
  • Tough time with transitions throughout the day?  
  • This is the resource for you.  
  • Don't have time or money to make a big production of getting movement in your program?  This is the resource for you!

I personally LOVE this physical activity resource.  It is made with ease of implementation in mind.  I do these (or variations of them) with my two year old daughter and we have a blast.  Sometimes we will be in the middle of playing with her toys and we'll do the balance poses, page 16.  I just show her the pictures and do the poses with her if you don't have time to make the cards.

What to expect from the We Have The Moves?

  • It is in English and Spanish.
  • Shares the movement skills, materials needed, how to play and possible variations
  • There are also side notes encourage Literacy, Math, Science, and Nutrition with the activity.
  • There are a total of 18 ideas.  The perfect amount to mix things up but not overwhelm a busy caregiver.

Perfect for:

  • Family Child Care Providers
  • License Exempt - Home Caregivers
  • Parents
  • Center Teachers

Page 6 provides you with tips to modify according to different ages in your care beginning from babies to K-3rd grade to older children.

Here is the link to the PDF.

Active Early - A Wisconsin Guide for Improving Childhood Physical Activity

This is a beautiful book filled with success stories, tips, charts, explanations of developmental milestones and how to gauge the child's development in comparison and much more.

It is comprehensive and while overwhelming at first, wonderful for some background information regarding the importance of physical activity for the children and ways to implement a physical activity program.

What to Expect?

The Development section of "Take Action" provides the reader with information regarding development, engaging children through different physical abilities and cultural necessities.   There are activity ideas that are in easy-to-see side boxes and some charts to view physical activity recommendations (divided by age group and types of activity) and gross motor development skills.

One of the "different from other resources" parts of this resource is the "Child Assessment" section.  It provides you with information regarding assessing children - tools you can use, what yo look for and why as well as "quick tips."  The following sections in "Take Action" include Daily Routines, Environment and Resources.

Page 47-49 has a chart of resources noting the resource, the cost and the topic and age group it is good for.

At the end you have the an Information about Business Policies and an Appendix with charts and assessments to use.  I really like Appendix D - Language Development Word Lists.  Take a look for yourself.  What do you like best?

Perfect for:

  • Child Care Director
  • Trainer
  • Caregiver who wants to know detailed information about physical activity and the importance it has on overall child development.

Tell us what resources you like to use!  Did you like these ones?

 

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Samantha Marshall, M.A.

Samantha is, just like you, excited to make a difference in our community and our world. With a Master of Arts degree in English Literature, you might ask how she found herself building and writing for a website focused on child care. From 1995 through 2001, Samantha started her career working for Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) sponsors which introduced her to the importance of non-profits, community and quality child care. Her experience with Sponsors, State Officials, and Family Child Care Providers left a great and lasting impression. Later in her career and her most recent position at SAGE Publications, an academic publisher, was as a product manager for a new online resource! During this time many of Samantha's passions collided. A love for the written word, children and the proliferation of knowledge as well as a fascination with the resources the internet gives us, building a community for child care on ChildCareInfo.com is the perfect way to make the difference she wanted to. Needless to say, she is very excited to be an active part of creating and building ChildCareInfo.com.